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October 19, 2021 | 7 Pages | English | Ziyad Baroud
Expanding the Prerogatives of Caretaker Governments in Times of Crisis

Caretaker governments became much more frequent and prolonged in recent years. While the average period to form a government was six days between 1989 and 2005, it increased to 100 days between 2005 and 2016[1], reaching up to a full year in two recent cases: Tammam Salam’s (2014) cabinet took 315 days to be formed, while Hassan Diab presided over a caretaker government for more than a year (from August 2020 to September 2021).

The prerogatives of caretaker governments are, however, subject to different interpretations, and a point of controversy among Lebanon’s politicians. Given that Lebanon’s pressing economic and financial crisis often required critical decisions from Prime Minister Hassan Diab’s caretaker government, this brief seeks to clarify the prerogatives that the constitution, legal jurisprudence, doctrine, and academics assign to caretaker governments, as well as what citizens can expect from them.


[1] Mounir Mahmalat and Declan Curran, ‘Fractionalization and Reform: A Framework of Political Collaboration on Reform with Application to Lebanon,’ Economics of Governance21, no. 2 (2020): 187–214.









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